EastCoast Properties,llc , Sales & Auction Service


You have finally found what you believe to be the perfect home. Then, something rings off in your gut. Maybe it was poor communication with the seller. Maybe a big change happened in your own life in a short period of time. All you know is that you really want to back out of the deal. You might have a lot of questions. Is this possible? Are there consequences? 


The short answers to these questions are yes, and yes. There is a possibility that you could be sued by your backing out of a deal. It’s rare that buyers are actually mandated to buy a home that they don’t actually want to buy. Sellers will, however, be able to keep any money that has already been paid as a deposit after a certain point in the dealings on a home sale. Sellers may also be awarded damages in some cases. 


Legally Backing Out Of The Contract


There are a few circumstances where buyers may have a legitimate right to back out of a contract on a home. If certain contingencies weren’t met, as a buyer, you’re free and clear to walk away. These circumstances include:


  • Financing falls through
  • You couldn’t sell your former home
  • Flaws in the home have not been disclosed
  • Property boundary line issues exist
  • Liens are against a home’s title
  • The seller does not meet the terms for improvement
  • Undisclosed uses exist for the land such as a pathway


If none of these reasons apply to you and you still have reservations about buying the home, you may need to sacrifice a huge chunk of money. The way that you exit the deal will all depend upon the contracts that were signed previously.


Other Buyers Are Waiting For The Home


If you are in a tight market and decide to back out of buying a home, you could be in luck. Often, if there’s a backup offer, it’s enough to satisfy a seller that at least the home will be sold promptly. However, don’t hold you breath when it comes to getting your deposits back. If you have already “promised” to buy a home, you can kiss the deposit goodbye, unfortunately. 


Always Hire A Real Estate Attorney


Whether your state requires it or not, you should always hire a real estate attorney. These professionals can help you to read each and every line of the contracts that you’re signing when buying a home. They will make suggestions as to how you can protect yourself through the process along the way. It’s a good investment to hire a lawyer when you’re buying a home.


For home sellers, a seller's market is ideal. Ultimately, this type of housing market empowers home sellers to maximize the value of their residences, and for good reason.

Typically, a seller's market is defined by several key traits, including:

1. Shortage of Quality Houses

A seller's market often features a shortage of quality houses, which means many home sellers frequently are able to set higher initial asking prices for their residences that they would in a buyer's market.

Although a seller's market may enable home sellers to get more for their houses, a home seller still must find ways to generate interest from prospective homebuyers.

For example, a home seller who revamps his or her home's exterior will be able to boost the residence's curb appeal. As a result, this home may generate greater interest from homebuyers than other residences that are on the market, increasing the chance of a quick home sale.

2. Abundance of Homebuyers

A seller's market may feature an abundance of homebuyers who are ready to make their homeownership dreams come true. As such, a home seller may receive offers as soon as his or her residence becomes available. And in some instances, a home seller might even get multiple offers that exceed his or her initial asking price.

Oftentimes, a seller's market provides increased confidence to home sellers. Conversely, it is important to establish realistic home selling expectations, regardless of the market conditions.

For instance, a home seller who prices his or her residence too high from the get-go is unlikely to generate significant interest – even in a seller's market. Thus, this home may remain on the market for many days, weeks or months, and a home seller might need to lower the price eventually.

On the other hand, offering a competitive price, i.e. a price that corresponds to the prices of similar houses in a particular area, is ideal. If you provide a competitive price on your home from day one, you should have no trouble receiving plenty of interest in it, especially in a seller's market.

3. Consistent Supply of Dependable Real Estate Agents

Real estate agents are happy to help home sellers maximize the value of their residences in a seller's market. These real estate professionals may possess many years of industry experience, which means that they likely understand the ups and downs of the real estate sector. Therefore, real estate agents can offer practical tips to ensure that you can stir up substantial interest in your home, get the most for your house and accelerate the home selling journey.

Perhaps best of all, your real estate agent will be happy to respond to any concerns or questions as you add your home to the housing market. This real estate professional works for you and will do everything possible to ensure you get the best results.

Ready to add your home to the real estate market? Employ a real estate professional, and you can move one step closer to optimizing the value of your house.




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